<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
</head>
<body>
John,<br>
<br>
Thereís a simple explanation for that lack of top line performance benefit - youíre not reading 16 GB then 16 GB then 16 GB etc.  Itís interleaved.<br>
<br>
Read ahead will do large reads, much larger than your 1 MiB i/o size, so itís all interleaved from four sources on every actual read operation.<br>
<br>
So youíre effectively pulling from all four sources at the same time throughout, so one of them completing faster just means you wait for the others to get their work done.  A similar effect would be more obvious if you had four independent files going in parallel
 as youíd see that file complete first. This is subtler but itís the same effect.<br>
<br>
- Patrick<br>
<br>
<br>
<hr style="display:inline-block;width:98%" tabindex="-1">
<div id="divRplyFwdMsg" dir="ltr"><font face="Calibri, sans-serif" style="font-size:11pt" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> lustre-discuss <lustre-discuss-bounces@lists.lustre.org> on behalf of John Bauer <bauerj@iodoctors.com><br>
<b>Sent:</b> Tuesday, April 3, 2018 1:23:30 AM<br>
<b>To:</b> Colin Faber<br>
<b>Cc:</b> lustre-discuss@lists.lustre.org<br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [lustre-discuss] varying sequential read performance.</font>
<div> </div>
</div>
<div style="background-color:#FFFFFF">Colin<br>
<br>
Since I do not have root privileges on the system, I do not have access to dropcache.  So, no, I do not flush cache between the dd runs.  The 10 dd runs were done in a single<br>
job submission and the scheduler does dropcache between jobs, so the first of the dd passes does start with a virgin cache.  What strikes me odd about this is the first dd<br>
run is the slowest and obviously must read all the data from the OSSs, which is confirmed by the plot I have added to the top, which indicates the total amount of data moved<br>
via lnet during the life of each dd process.  Notice that the second dd run, which lnetstats indicates also moves the entire 64 GB file from the OSSs, is 3 times faster, and has<br>
to work with a non-virgin cache.  Runs 4 through 10 all move only 48GB via lnet because one of the OSCs keeps its entire 16GB that is needed in cache across all the runs.<br>
Even with the significant advantage that runs 4-10 have, you could never tell in the dd results.  Run 5 is slightly faster than run 2, and run 7 is as slow as run 0.<br>
<br>
John<br>
<br>
<br>
<img alt="" src="cid:part1.A7414AA4.17B94BD3@iodoctors.com"><br>
<br>
<div class="x_moz-cite-prefix">On 4/3/2018 12:20 AM, Colin Faber wrote:<br>
</div>
<blockquote type="cite">
<div dir="auto">Are you flushing cache between test runs?</div>
<br>
<div class="x_gmail_quote">
<div dir="ltr">On Mon, Apr 2, 2018, 6:06 PM John Bauer <<a href="mailto:bauerj@iodoctors.com">bauerj@iodoctors.com</a>> wrote:<br>
</div>
<blockquote class="x_gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
          .8ex; border-left:1px #ccc solid; padding-left:1ex">
<div bgcolor="#FFFFFF">I am running dd 10 times consecutively to  read a 64GB file ( stripeCount=4 stripeSize=4M ) on a Lustre client(version 2.10.3) that has 64GB of memory.<br>
The client node was dedicated.<br>
<br>
<b><font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">for pass in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10<br>
do<br>
   of=/dev/null if=${file} count=128000 bs=512K<br>
done<br>
</font></b><br>
Instrumentation of the I/O from dd reveals varying performance.  In the plot below, the bottom frame has wall time<br>
on the X axis, and file position of the dd reads on the Y axis, with a dot plotted at the wall time and starting file position of every read. 
<br>
The slopes of the lines indicate the data transfer rate, which vary from 475MB/s to 1.5GB/s.  The last 2 passes have sharp breaks<br>
in the performance, one with increasing performance, and one with decreasing performance.<br>
<br>
The top frame indicates the amount of memory used by each of the file's 4 OSCs over the course of the 10 dd runs.  Nothing terribly odd here except that<br>
one of the OSC's eventually has its entire stripe ( 16GB ) cached and then never gives any up.<br>
<br>
I should mention that the file system has 320 OSTs.  I found LU-6370 which eventually started discussing LRU management issues on systems with high<br>
numbers of OST's leading to reduced RPC sizes.<br>
<br>
Any explanations for the varying performance?<br>
Thanks, <br>
John<br>
<br>
<img alt="" src="cid:part1.FE7755F6.C36ADB75@iodoctors.com">
<pre class="x_m_179390239102776222moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
I/O Doctors, LLC
507-766-0378
<a class="x_m_179390239102776222moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:bauerj@iodoctors.com" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">bauerj@iodoctors.com</a></pre>
</div>
_______________________________________________<br>
lustre-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:lustre-discuss@lists.lustre.org" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">lustre-discuss@lists.lustre.org</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.lustre.org/listinfo.cgi/lustre-discuss-lustre.org" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">http://lists.lustre.org/listinfo.cgi/lustre-discuss-lustre.org</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
</blockquote>
<br>
<pre class="x_moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
I/O Doctors, LLC
507-766-0378
<a class="x_moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:bauerj@iodoctors.com">bauerj@iodoctors.com</a></pre>
</div>
</body>
</html>